Margaret Williams Research Grants

Margaret Williams Research Grants
for Botanical Research

The Nevada Native Plant Society (NNPS) Margaret Williams research grants program will annually award up to two grants of not over $1000 each.

These grants are designed to facilitate basic botanical research and increase our understanding of Nevada's native and naturalized flora. The research should cover some aspect of our flora from single species to whole communities or ecosystems. Research can include, but is not limited to, disciplines such as conservation, landscape analysis, ecology, biogeography, or taxonomy.

CRITERIA AND PROCEDURES

Written proposals are to be submitted to the Small Grants Program chair. Research proposals should be concise and to the point! Each proposal should contain a title, objectives, methods, expected final product, a brief statement of applicant's qualifications, and a project budget for how NNPS funds will be spent. If applicant is a student an accompanying letter from their advisor is required (maximum of one page). Inclusion of an e-mail address will facilitate notification. Next deadline is 1 February 2018.

Costs covered by these grants include travel, lodging, meals, services such as computer time, graphics, phone, copying, and film and processing. Non-eligible costs include equipment, wages, typing, and costs unrelated to the project.

A decision will be reached by 1 March 2018. All applicants will be notified of the committee's decision. The committee may decide not to fund a grant in any given year.

Successful applicants will be required to discuss their research results with NNPS. This can be through an article for our newsletter or by giving a presentation at an evening NNPS meeting.

Support in the form of a NNPS Margaret Williams Grant will be awarded only once for any one project.

We would prefer proposals be emailed to Jim Morefield at grants@nvnps.org(link sends e-mail). They can also be snail-mailed to the following address: Nevada Native Plant Society, Small Grants Chair, P.O. Box 8965, Reno, NV 89507-8965.


Grant History

One Grant was awarded in March 2016 to:

Temitope Israel Borokini, PhD student at the University of Nevada, Reno, to support his research on “Genetic diversity, distribution modelling and soil seed bank density studies on threatened Ivesia webberi Gray”.

 

Two Grants were awarded in March 2015 to:

Joshua Harrison, PhD student at the University of Nevada, Reno, to support his research on the population genetics and fungal community of Astragalus lentiginosus.

Brian Smithers, PhD student at the University of California, Davis, to support his research on climate change-induced range shifts in Great Basin sub-alpine bristlecone pine forests.

 

Two Grants were awarded in March 2014 to:

Sarah Barga, a Ph.D. student at the University of Nevada, Reno, was awarded a grant to support her research on Germination Ecology of Great Basin forbs.

Jeffrey Rose, a Ph.D. student at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, will be learning more about the genus Polemonium (Jacobs ladders, skypilots) in his study entitled "Evolution and Biogeography of Polemonium (Polemoniaceae): Affinities of Polemonium nevadense Wherry." 

 

One Grant was awarded in March 2013 to:

Lea Condon, a Ph.D. candidate at Oregon State University, Corvallis, to support her research proposal entitled ‘Bryofighters’ Promote Ecosystem Function Following Fire.

 

One grant was awarded in March 2012, to:

Christopher W. Kopp, a Ph.D. candidate at University of California, San Diego, to support his research proposal entitled Understanding the impacts of increasing temperatures and sagebrush encroachment in a Great Basin alpine plant community.

 

Two grants were awarded in March 2011, to:

Mare Nazaire, a Ph.D. candidate at Washington State University, Pullman, to support her research proposal entitled The geographic and ecological basis of species richness: diversification in western North American Mertensia(Boraginaceae)”

Allison Phillips, a Masters student at University of Nevada, Reno, in support of her proposal entitled Restoration using the Nevada native perennial grass Poa secunda (sandberg bluegrass) in cheatgrass invaded systems.

 

Two grants were awarded in March 2010, to:

James P. Riser II, a Ph.D. student at Washington State University, Pullman, for Species Boundaries and Phylogeography of the Dwarf Milkweed Group (Asclepias uncialis-ruthiae-eastwoodiana-sanjuanensis, Asclepiadoideae: Apocynaceae): The Nevada Endemic Asclepias eastwoodiana.

Naomi S. Fraga, a Ph.D. student at the Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden and Claremont Graduate University, California, for Conservation, Taxonomy, and Reproductive Biology of the Mimulus palmeri clade (Phrymaceae).

 

No Grants were awarded in 2009.



Two Grants were awarded in March 2008 to:

Ben Grady, University of Wisconsin, Madison, to support his research on speciation and edaphic endemism in Eriogonum (Polygonaceae).

Genevieve Walden, San Francisco State University, to support her research on molecular systematics of Phacelia.

 

Two Grants were awarded in March 2007 to:

Sarah DeGroot, Claremont Graduate University, to support her research on quantitative morphology and biogeography of Eriastrum (Polemoniaceae).

Alan DeQueiroz, to support his research on genetic differentiation across high elevation islands of the Great Basin.

 

One Grant was awarded in March 2006 to:

Elizabeth Zacharias, University of California, Berkeley, to support her research on the evolutionary relationship between Atriplex phyllostegia and Atriplex covillei (Chenopodiaceae).

 

One Grant was awarded in March 2005 to:

John Schenk, Washington State University, to support his research on Mentzelia section Bartonia (Loasaceae), the blazing stars of Nevada.

 

One Grant was awarded in March 2004 to:

Brian J. Knaus, Oregon State University, Corvallis, to support his research on Astragalus lentiginosus.

 

One Grant was awarded in March 2002 to:

Briana Gross, Indiana University, to support her research on the origins of Helianthus deserticola.

 

Two Grants were awarded in March 2001 to:

Justen Bryant Whittall, University of California, Santa Barbara, to support his research on Aquilegia.

Michael Patrick Griffith, Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden, Claremont, CA, to support his research on hybridization in Opuntia.

 

Two Grants were awarded in March 2000 to:

Jason Andrew Alexander, Oregon State University, Corvallis, to support his research on hybrid recombination in Astragalus.

Gina Glenne, Utah State University, Logan, to support her research on two-toned beardtongue (Penstemon bicolor) in Clark County and its two-toned pollinator dilemma.